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Carpenter Costin Blog

Keep the Ticks & Mosquitoes Out of Your Backyard in 2021

The summer is finally here and that means it’s time to get outdoors and enjoy the long, sun-filled  days and beautiful summer weather. Unfortunately, living in Massachusetts also means that along with the ocean breezes and fantastic weather comes some pest issues that may be lurking in your own backyard. 

Between the prevalence of Black-legged ticks and those nuisance mosquitoes, enjoying a backyard BBQ with family or evening under the stars with friends can become a worrisome ordeal. Luckily, there are some solutions to these issues that can give homeowners control again over their own yard.


Let’s take a closer look at the hazards that ticks and mosquitoes can pose to you and your family as well as some simple ways to make your backyard safer this pest season. 

tick mite under microscope

The Dangers of Ticks & Mosquitoes 

Both ticks and mosquitoes can carry diseases that are harmful (and sometimes fatal) to humans. Avoiding tick-borne and mosquito-borne diseases is the best prevention against contracting these diseases. 

Tick-borne Diseases 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “The most common tick-borne diseases in Massachusetts are Lyme Disease, Babesiosis, and Anaplasmosis. Other diseases that are more rare, but still occur, are Tularemia, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Borrelia miyamotoi, and Powassan virus.” 

Mosquito-borne Diseases 

Diseases that can be spread by the bite of a mosquito (or mosquito-borne diseases) include: the Zika Virus, West Nile Virus, Chikungunya Virus, Eastern Equine Encephalitis, Dengue, and Malaria. Thankfully, in New England we mostly need to focus on two diseases: West Nile Virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE or “Triple E”), according to MassGov.com. 

backyard party

Prevention Techniques 

Preventing bites from ticks and mosquitoes is the best way to prevent vector borne diseases. Here are a few steps that you can take to protect your friends and family even when just stepping into your backyard. 

 

  • Wear insect repellent with the ingredient DEET. 
  • Treat your clothing with 0.5% permethrin, which will deter bites from both ticks and mosquitoes. 
  • Wear light clothing that covers as much of your skin as possible. 
  • Avoid heading outdoors during peak times for mosquitoes including dawn and dusk. 
  • Cut back trees and bushes from your backyard. 
  • Remove any standing water that could become a breeding ground for mosquitoes. 
  • Keep your lawn trimmed short. 
  • Shower soon after being outdoors to remove any ticks that have not yet embedded themselves. 
  • Check your children and partner’s skin for ticks. They especially like hidden areas such as armpits, hairlines, groin, and behind the knees. 

How Carpenter Costin Can Help

Taking personal precautions to keep the ticks and mosquitoes at bay is one thing, but Carpenter Costin can also help remove the problem from your backyard with our tick and mosquito treatment options. Talk to our specialists about what type of treatment and timing of treatments for your property would be best for your family. Reduce the worry this summer season about what disease you may be exposed to in your own backyard with our tick and mosquito treatments. 






They're Baaaaack! Brood X Cicadas are Emerging

You’ve probably heard it on the news about the emergence of Brood X Cicadas making their debut. You also might be wondering what the buzz is all about? 

If you’re traveling along the eastern seaboard or the Midwest in the next couple of days and weeks, you will be hard pressed to find a surface that is not covered with millions, if not billions of these humming, buzzing creatures. After 17 years underground, they have begun to emerge enmass across the Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, and Southeastern regions of the United States. 

While the New England region is not within the 15 state radius where they are expected to emerge, this phenomenon is still an environmental marvel that we love to examine a bit closer in today’s blog. 

molting cicada

What is Brood X? 

According to National Geographic, there are approximately 3,000 varieties of Cicadas worldwide. Some varieties emerge every year, mate, and begin the cycle of life going from eggs to nymphs to full grown adults. After taking about 6-10 weeks for the eggs to hatch and develop into nymphs, the Cicada then burrows itself into the ground where it sucks the liquids of plant and tree roots. There the Cicadas remain until they emerge from the ground. 

When they emerge depends upon what variety and region. For instance, some Cicadas emerge every year while others, like Brood X, wait 17 years in their cyclical pattern to re-emerge. 

2021 marks the point in Brood X’s cycle where they come out of hiding and begin to look for a mate to start the process all over again. 

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What You Should Know About Brood X Cicadas

Since most of us live in Massachusetts or the New England region, we have little to worry about when it comes to these rather loud, often creepy critters that can damage trees during the egg-laying process. Here are a few facts that may help you as you watch the news or watch with wonder as the Great Eastern Brood (also known as Brood X) emerges. 

  • Cicadas do put stress on trees in a number of ways. First the adults eat the leaves of the trees. Thankfully, this is usually cosmetic in nature and can be remedied with pruning. However, when the females lay their eggs under the bark of a tree, twig, or branch the wood is in danger of splitting, also known as “flagging” in the arborist world. Finally, Cicada larvae tunnels into the ground and sustains itself on the juice of the roots of nearby trees and plants. This feeding process can rob a tree of its nutrients. 
  • Cicada sightings can be tracked on the Cicada Mapping app.
  • In Brood X, only the male Cicadas can sing to attract a mate. While much of their buzzing and calls are a mystery, it is believed that the sound is produced within the membranes called tymbals, and their hollow abdomens amplify the call.  
  • Cicadas wait for the perfect conditions to emerge. They wait for the right conditions for breeding, which are when the ground thaws to 65°F (18°C) in a brood’s designated year. (National Geographic) 
  • Cicadas are referred to as different “Broods” labelled with Roman numerals. They usually emerge in intervals of 13 to 17 years. That means that most years some brood will be emerging. This year (2021) just happens to be a largely anticipated year since this 17 year periodical emergence is expected to be one of the largest in recent history. 

Follow along with the news reports on where the latest Cicadas are emerging and how many they estimate to be buzzing. Just be careful, they can hit over 100 decibels as they make their calls! 





Controlling and Preventing Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Infestation

Ensure your Hemlocks are safe from this invasive pest 

Hemlocks are wonderful trees to have in your landscape, and their density makes them a great choice for planting in privacy screens. However, without proper care, Hemlocks are very susceptible to Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, which can seriously damage and eventually kill your Hemlocks.

What is Hemlock Woolly Adelgid?

Hemlock-woolly-adelgid

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA) are tiny, aphid-like insects that are barely visible. It is atypical of most other insect species as it is in a dormant stage for much of the growing season and starts to be active mid-October through the winter.

When is Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Active?

As temperatures begin to cool in the fall, Hemlock Woolly Adelgid leaves its summer dormancy to feast on the Eastern Hemlocks. Depending on the temperature, this usually occurs between late September and October.

By mid-February HWA starts producing new egg masses. This is when most people become aware of this pest because of the white, cottony egg masses that are lined up at the base of the needles of their Hemlocks. Then by mid-July, the immature insects settle on the stems, at the base of the needles, and become dormant, neither feeding nor developing. Preventative or controlling treatments at this time are best as they will keep the pests at bay all fall, winter, and into the spring – when they are most devastating to Hemlocks.

How Does Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Damage Trees?

Unlike other insects, such as Winter Moths, that feed on the leaves, needles, twigs, or new buds of trees, the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA) does not damage Hemlocks by feeding. The Hemlock Woolly Adelgid sucks the sap from Hemlock needles but also introduces a chemical from its saliva which acts as a toxin. This toxin accelerates the demise of the tree. The loss of sap will cause needles to brown and drop, leaving trees unable to produce food and energy via photosynthesis.

Healthy trees, in good growing sites, may withstand infestations for 5-10 years before being seriously affected. Trees stressed from drought, soil compaction or those in poor growing sites may succumb to HWA within 3 years. Hemlocks infested with Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, usually stick out like a sore thumb, as the rich green color is replaced by a grayish or yellowish hue. In a group of Hemlocks, you can usually pick out one infested with HWA fairly easily.

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Affecting Mass amount of Trees

This pest attacks both the Eastern (Canada) Hemlock and the Carolina Hemlock, two species common to New England. The Western Hemlock is resistant to this pest, but does not grow well in the Northeast.

Preventing and Managing Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

Once this pest has been identified on Hemlocks, it must be handled quickly. Applications of horticultural oil have been shown to be extremely effective against Hemlock Woolly Adelgid. For the best preventative measures, the foliar applications should be in both early spring and fall to keep your Hemlocks free of this pest.

The horticultural oil kills the organism by suffocation and is effective against all life stages, including the eggs. Hemlocks that have already been infested may require more treatments to kill the pest, and keep it from returning.

For trees that have already been seriously infested, we recommend pairing a foliar application with a soil injection treatment for the best chance of saving the Hemlock tree. However, if the toxin from their saliva has already infiltrated the tree and it may take a while for the tree to rebound. It can take an entire year or more until the toxicity in the tree is reduced.

The common misconception among homeowners with treated Hemlocks is that they think the tree is still infested because they see the small “white spots” on their trees. What really happens when treatments are applied correctly is that the insects are killed, but their woolly protective covering remains on the tree. Over time the woolly covering (white spots) will fall off.

Once the pest has been brought under control, the trees continue to require once or twice yearly treatments as well as regular pruning to prevent infestation. Untreated trees in surrounding areas will act a reservoir for this pest and serve to re-infest treated trees. HWA spreads through wind and birds which are primarily responsible for the movement of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid from tree to tree.

Conclusions

Controlling and preventing Hemlock Woolly Adelgid is relatively straight forward, and the insects can be killed quickly. Hemlocks should be treated for HWA every year. Even if your Hemlocks have not been infested, these pests have spread so rapidly that there is no way to ensure your trees will remain free of infestation. The most popular question regarding HWA treatments is, “What does it cost?” Depending on the number and size of trees to be treated. The cost of removing and/or replacing the dead Hemlocks is significantly greater than the investment in HWA preventative treatments, so keeping your Hemlocks safe and healthy with preventative treatments is always a wise idea.

If you have Hemlocks on your property it is a good idea to schedule a free inspection with a Certified Arborist to ensure the health and safety of your Hemlock trees. Request a free evaluation below.

plant-health-care-consultation

Editors Note: This post was originally published in April 2012 and has been completely revamped and updated for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

Controlling and Preventing Winter Moths

What Are Winter Moths?

Winter moths are invasive pests, originating from Europe and Western Asia. These insects were first found in North America in the 1930s; however, their population in Massachusetts exploded, causing home owners, property managers, and arborists’ tremendous stress, as winter moth larvae shredded and stripped the leaves off of their variety of deciduous trees.

Winter Moth Appearance

winter-moth-caterpillar-c-milan-zubrik-forest-research-institute-slovakia-bugwood.org

The winter moth larvae are pale green caterpillars with white stripes that run down either side of their body. The male winter moth have a light tan color, with four elongated wings that encompass their bodies. The wings of males gives them a “furry” look. Female winter moths have a grey color, as well as tiny scales that give off that furry look just like the males. Unlike the males, the females are incapable of flight.

Dangers of the Winter Moth

Winter moths are only dangerous to your trees in the larval, or caterpillar stage; however, you can treat for them in both the egg and caterpillar stage with either spray or injection treatments. The larvae or caterpillars once hatched will scale the trees searching for fresh buds and leaves they can start devouring. Once they find their fresh bud they wriggle between the scales of the newly blooming buds and begin feeding on the flower and foliar buds from within. The caterpillars don’t stop and will continue to migrate from bud to bud devouring as much as they can. Large populations can quickly defoliate trees which can result in limb or tree failure. Once the caterpillars become mature they drop to the ground and envelope themselves in a soft, wooly cocoon for pupation. When they finish pupation, they emerge from the soil throughout November and December but if the temperature remains mild they can be active into January.

Common Tree Hosts for the Winter Moth

  • Oak Tree

  • Maple Tree

  • Cherry Trees

  • Ash Tree

  • White Elm Tree

  • Spruce Trees

  • Crabapple and Apple Trees

Prevention and Management Winter Moth

Winter Moths Can Be Controlled and Prevented

Let’s consider the calendar year here in Massachusetts. If we’re experiencing an average year temperature wise, you can expect winter moth eggs to begin hatching between late March and the third week in April. If we’re having an unusually warm late winter and early spring they will hatch sooner. Conversely, a colder winter and early spring will delay their hatching.

Winter Moth Prevention

It is best to prevent the pests from hatching with a horticultural oil treatment early in the spring. When the winter moths hatch they begin feasting on the budding leaves very early on, which can be extremely devastating to a tree. The winter moths will continue to feed and grow throughout the year. Treatments become more difficult as the winter moths grow, but it is still possible to control these pests. Spray or soil/trunk injection treatments with Spinosads and B.t.k can be used to defeat the caterpillars, which would otherwise feast on your leaves until dropping to the ground in May or June for the summer.

Treating and Controlling Winter Moth

In order to effectively treat winter moth, you first need to establish what stage the pests are in. Once you’ve identified the stage, then you can plan your treatment attack, but not without considering some other variables such as the size of tree to be treated, or proximity of homes or structures. These variables will help decide what type of treatment to use: topical spray application or injection treatment. For example, if you have an infested tree hanging over your swimming pool, you may want to consider an injection treatment.

It is important to treat for winter moths early in the year. Waiting until you physically see damage often means it is too late. Consider meeting with a Certified Arborist or Plant Health Expert in the late winter to discuss winter moth treatments.

If you have any questions or concerns about Winter Moth please contact us at 877-308-8733 or click the button below. 

request-a-winter-moth-consultation  

winter moth control

Pictured here are two examples of severe winter moth damage, with the culprit in the middle.

Editors Note: This post was originally published in March 2012 and has been revamped and updated for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

Rhododendrons VS Black Vine Weevil

What is a Black Vine Weevil?

The Black Vine Weevil (BVW) is an insect pest that injures plants, Rhododendrons being top choice throughout the US. In Massachusetts there are few natural predators of this species. 

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Adult Black Vine Weevils

The adult weevil is dark gray to black and has subtle white flecking. It has a short broad snout. It can lay as many as 300 eggs near plants over a period of 2-3 weeks. Eggs are laid near the base of the plants and will hatch in two weeks. Black Vine Weevils do not fly so they crawl from shrub to shrub. During daytime the adults hide in dark places; soil, garden debris, lead litter, mulch and even the crevices of the plant. The adult feeding rarely causes serious plant injury, however the feeding habit of the notching of leaves is evidence the pest is present. Action should be taken to mitigate damage by the next generation of BVW. 

Black Vine Weevil -

Black Vine Weevil Larvae

BVW Larvae are a creamy-white color with a brown head. They are the most destructive stage of the Black Vine Weevil. In August, the C-shaped larvae begin tunneling through roots and can girdle the stem feeding just below the soil line on cambium and cause plant death. When the BVW feeds it can cause nutrient deficiencies and poor functioning roots. If the plant has nutrient deficiencies or poor functioning roots the leaves yellow, wilt and plants can die. Thinner foliage is more susceptible than a thicker plant. 

Controlling Black Vine Weevil

BVW is an active feeder that will quickly drop to the ground if disturbed. This is when foliar applications work best. We recommend doing the following:

  • Pruning rhododendrons so foliage does not touch the ground reducing the Black Vine Weevil's access to the shrubs
  • Clear leaf litter to keep BVW from being able to hide underneath it
  • Apply two Summer Foliar Treatments
  • Fertilize your plants
  • Remove dead or infested foliage to limit overwintering sites

Are you seeing notches on your Rhododendron leaves? Is the damage so extensive that the entire leaf edges are jagged and unsightly? Give us a call now, young new growth is the particular foliage of choice for the BVW. We have more than one control option available.

Keeping plants healthy and happy is the first defense, fertilization is recommended!

If you have any questions about Black Vine Weevil or are interested in any of our services please do not hesitate to contact us at 877-308-8733 or click the link below!

Request A Free Consultation

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid is Killing Our Trees

What is Hemlock Woolly Adelgid?

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA) is a tiny insect that is barely visible. It is atypical of most other insect species as it is dormant for much of the growing season and active throughout the winter.Hemlock-woolly-adelgid.jpeg

When is Hemlock Woolly Adelgid active?

By mid-July, the immature insects settle on the stems, at the base of the needles, and become dormant, neither feeding nor developing. By mid-October, the insect resumes feeding and development. By mid-February they start producing new egg masses. Most people become aware of this pest when they notice the white, cottony egg masses lined up at the base of the needles on their Hemlocks.

How Does HWA Damage Trees?

The Hemlock Woolly Adelgid sucks the sap from Hemlock needles but also introduces a chemical from its saliva which acts as a toxin. This toxin accelerates the demise of the tree. The loss of sap will cause needles to brown and drop, leaving trees unable to produce food and energy via photosynthesis.

Healthy trees, in good growing sites, may withstand infestations for 5-10 years before being seriously affected. Trees stressed from drought, soil compaction or those in poor growing sites may succumb to HWA within 3 years.

This pest attacks both the Eastern (Canada) Hemlock and the Carolina Hemlock, two species common to New England. The Western Hemlock is resistant to this pest, but does not grow well in the Northeast.

Managing Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

Once this pest has been identified on Hemlocks, it must be managed quickly. Applications of horticultural oil have been shown to be extremely effective against Hemlock Woolly Adelgid. The oil kills the organism by suffocation and is effective against all life stages, including the eggs. Severely infested trees will need more intensive pesticide treatments.

Once the pest has been brought under control, the trees continue to require once or twice yearly treatments. Untreated trees in surrounding areas will act a reservoir for this pest and serve to re-infest treated trees. Wind and birds are primarily responsible for the movement of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid from tree to tree.

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid is a serious threat to our beautiful Hemlocks and should not be ignored. If you have Hemlocks on your property it is a good idea to schedule a free inspection with a Certified Arborist to ensure the health and safety of your Hemlock trees. Request a free evaluation below.

REQUEST A FREE CONSULTATION

 

Why Heavy Winter Snowfall Can Lead to a Bad Tick Season

Expect a bad tick season as this winter's thick layer of snow served as insulation for the over-wintering tick population

Before we completely put this past winter behind us, let's not forget about a problem that lurks on the horizon as a result of the tremendous amount of snow we received. The tick population is expected to explode this year due to the protection they received from the blanket of insulating snow. Usually a significant portion of the over-wintering ticks die from freezing conditions, but the snow was in their favor this past season.

[Click here to Learn How to Treat Your Property for Deer Ticks] 

An interesting fact is that ticks are not actually insects, since they have two distinct body parts and 8 legs. In fact, they have more in common with arthropods like spiders and mites. Their evolution comes from crustaceans, but try not to think of that when eating lobster. In New England we are primarily concerned with the Suborder Ixodida, otherwise known as hard ticks. There are several species of hard ticks and they are the vectors of many diseases, most notably Lyme disease. Nearly 300,000 new cases are documented in the US each year and the rate continues to rise year after year. The numbers have reached epidemic proportions and billions are spent each year trying to treat the symptoms of this debilitating disease.

Tick Disease Powassan

Unfortunately, there is a newly identified disease called Powassan that is also transmitted by ticks with devastating consequences. Although most people who are infected do not show signs of the disease, others do suffer encephalitis and even death. It goes without saying that those with low immunity systems are most at risk and should avoid wooded areas or tall grassy fields.

On average, a female tick will lay approximately 2,000 eggs in May. These pest are most vulnerable for treatment during the summer months and a product using Permethrin is best used for controls. The best means of applying the controls is spraying with a high pressure commercial hydraulic spray unit, specifically directed towards areas of tick habitation.

If you'd like to protect your loved ones from ticks, consider consulting with an Arborist or Plant Health Care Specialist to see what you can do to mitigate the threat of ticks on your property.

Request a Free Consultation

Tips For Removing Ticks

The tick population in our area has exploded. Heavy snow cover this past winter kept ticks nice and warm, and helped them multiply unchecked. Very cold, snow-less winters tend to diminish populations.

Some species of ticks carry Lyme disease, which can be difficult to treat when contracted in humans and animals. These tiny bloodsuckers multiply quickly and are found in lawns, tall grasses and woods. Ticks get picked up when people or animals walk by and brush against them. They will then attach to skin and feed on your blood until they are so heavy or full that they can no long hold on and fall off on their own.

What To Do If You Get Bitten By a Tick

If you or your pet does get bitten, here are some tips to remove ticks:

  • First, don't panic!
  • Clean the area around the bite with rubbing alcohol
  • Use tweezers to grab the tick and get as close to your skin as possible
  • Pull upward with steady pressure. Don't twist or wiggle or pull too hard too fast - you don't want the body to separate from the mouth!
  • If the mouth does separate, use tweezers to remove the mouth
  • Once removed, do not throw ticks in the trash as they are difficult to kill. Burning (as in a campfire) or flushing down the toilet in soapy water is better.

Treating Your Yard for Ticks

The best tip we can offer in regard to ticks: Treat your yard to help control these pests and protect your family and pets! Just one monthly treatment suppresses the population. It's easy, fast, and non-disruptive: as soon as the treatment is dry you can head back outside to enjoy your yard. Imagine how nice it would be to play in the grass without worrying about ticks. And pet owners: the treatment kills fleas, too!

We offer a 100% all natural program which means that we do not use any chemicals that can harm your plants or beneficial insects.

For more information about treating your yard for ticks or to request a free consultation, call us at 877-308-8733.

Request Tick & Mosquito Treatment

Plant Health and Pest Management Program Plus a 10% Prepay Discount

Understanding what is delivered in your plant health care and pest control programs will help set expectations and goals for your landscape.

Everyone wants the perfect landscape, with healthy and beautiful trees and shrubs; however, not everyone is willing to invest in a comprehensive plant health care program. Even those who do invest in plant health care may not understand the plant health care pest managementcomprehensiveness of their programs. Knowing what to expect from a landscape care program will help you achieve your goals, and limit landscape-associated headaches.

A plant health care or pest management program is comprised of a series of visits that include inspection and treatment of the trees and shrubs on your property. At Carpenter Costin, our Pest Management Program consists of five visits, and our Plant Health Care Program consists of eight visits.

Not all plant health care programs are equal. Programs depend on the knowledge and equipment that a company has, and determines if they’re capable of providing various technical services. Most providers offer programs based on timely visits, and usually start at three-visit programs and go up to comprehensive eight-visit programs. One-time target treatments are also available for specific prevention, such as Hemlock Woolly Adelgid or Ticks.

Determining which program is best for you should be based on your property and your budget; however, for optimal results, it is recommended that you opt for a minimum of five visits. A five visit program ensures control and prevention of insects, and also provides control on plant diseases. Opting for anything less than five visits jeopardizes the ability to control the pests, and is not the best investment for your landscape.

Many collegiate horticultural programs recommend property visits and treatments every two weeks throughout the growing season; however, at an average cost of about $80, the price tag for such a program would be substantial. A five visit program offers the best bang for your buck, while an eight visit program provides the most comprehensive control and prevention. If it fits your budget, more visits are better; however, five and eight visit programs are very economical without sacrificing quality.

Although plant health care experts are great at predicting when certain pests will become active based on factors of phenology, they cannot forecast this more than a few weeks to a month in advance - and so much is based on micro-climates (meaning pests active in Swampscott may not be active in Andover). Relying on a three visit program to handle your plant health care needs may jeopardize the ability to tailor due to current conditions and micro-climates.

For best results, we recommend that you choose a five visit or eight visit program. There is exceptional value in choosing a five or eight visit plan, and it ensures that your trees and shrubs maintain great health. A three visit program may be less expensive, but we urge you to be cautious when choosing a plan under five visits, as sacrifices must be made. For more plant health information, request a free consultation with one of our experts.

We're extending our 10% discount for prepaying for insect & disease management services until March 15. 

plant health and pest control

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

HWAAn insect is threatening to destroy one of our most valuable native trees—the Eastern Hemlock.

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA) is a tiny, aphid-like insect introduced to the U.S. from Asia. Since 1988, when it was discovered in the state, it has slowly spread throughout the region, usually by wind and birds.  In addition to being small, HWA is different from other insects as it lays dormant much of the growing season and becomes active throughout the winter, producing new egg masses as early as February.

HWA can be easily recognized by the presence of white cottony egg masses on Hemlock twigs. Damage is caused when the eggs hatch and the young feed by sucking sap from the twigs, killing them.

Trees infested with Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, untreated, may decline and die very quickly. Once HWA has been identified, it should be treated immediately. Effective treatments are available to manage HWA.

If you have any questions or concerns about Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, Call 877-308-8733 now to have your Hemlocks inspected by a certified Arborist and protected against this deadly pest.

Check out our growing Insect and Disease Glossary!

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