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Carpenter Costin Blog

Controlling and Preventing Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Infestation

Ensure your Hemlocks are safe from this invasive pest 

Hemlocks are wonderful trees to have in your landscape, and their density makes them a great choice for planting in privacy screens. However, without proper care, Hemlocks are very susceptible to Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, which can seriously damage and eventually kill your Hemlocks.

What is Hemlock Woolly Adelgid?

Hemlock-woolly-adelgid

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA) are tiny, aphid-like insects that are barely visible. It is atypical of most other insect species as it is in a dormant stage for much of the growing season and starts to be active mid-October through the winter.

When is Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Active?

As temperatures begin to cool in the fall, Hemlock Woolly Adelgid leaves its summer dormancy to feast on the Eastern Hemlocks. Depending on the temperature, this usually occurs between late September and October.

By mid-February HWA starts producing new egg masses. This is when most people become aware of this pest because of the white, cottony egg masses that are lined up at the base of the needles of their Hemlocks. Then by mid-July, the immature insects settle on the stems, at the base of the needles, and become dormant, neither feeding nor developing. Preventative or controlling treatments at this time are best as they will keep the pests at bay all fall, winter, and into the spring – when they are most devastating to Hemlocks.

How Does Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Damage Trees?

Unlike other insects, such as Winter Moths, that feed on the leaves, needles, twigs, or new buds of trees, the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA) does not damage Hemlocks by feeding. The Hemlock Woolly Adelgid sucks the sap from Hemlock needles but also introduces a chemical from its saliva which acts as a toxin. This toxin accelerates the demise of the tree. The loss of sap will cause needles to brown and drop, leaving trees unable to produce food and energy via photosynthesis.

Healthy trees, in good growing sites, may withstand infestations for 5-10 years before being seriously affected. Trees stressed from drought, soil compaction or those in poor growing sites may succumb to HWA within 3 years. Hemlocks infested with Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, usually stick out like a sore thumb, as the rich green color is replaced by a grayish or yellowish hue. In a group of Hemlocks, you can usually pick out one infested with HWA fairly easily.

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Affecting Mass amount of Trees

This pest attacks both the Eastern (Canada) Hemlock and the Carolina Hemlock, two species common to New England. The Western Hemlock is resistant to this pest, but does not grow well in the Northeast.

Preventing and Managing Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

Once this pest has been identified on Hemlocks, it must be handled quickly. Applications of horticultural oil have been shown to be extremely effective against Hemlock Woolly Adelgid. For the best preventative measures, the foliar applications should be in both early spring and fall to keep your Hemlocks free of this pest.

The horticultural oil kills the organism by suffocation and is effective against all life stages, including the eggs. Hemlocks that have already been infested may require more treatments to kill the pest, and keep it from returning.

For trees that have already been seriously infested, we recommend pairing a foliar application with a soil injection treatment for the best chance of saving the Hemlock tree. However, if the toxin from their saliva has already infiltrated the tree and it may take a while for the tree to rebound. It can take an entire year or more until the toxicity in the tree is reduced.

The common misconception among homeowners with treated Hemlocks is that they think the tree is still infested because they see the small “white spots” on their trees. What really happens when treatments are applied correctly is that the insects are killed, but their woolly protective covering remains on the tree. Over time the woolly covering (white spots) will fall off.

Once the pest has been brought under control, the trees continue to require once or twice yearly treatments as well as regular pruning to prevent infestation. Untreated trees in surrounding areas will act a reservoir for this pest and serve to re-infest treated trees. HWA spreads through wind and birds which are primarily responsible for the movement of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid from tree to tree.

Conclusions

Controlling and preventing Hemlock Woolly Adelgid is relatively straight forward, and the insects can be killed quickly. Hemlocks should be treated for HWA every year. Even if your Hemlocks have not been infested, these pests have spread so rapidly that there is no way to ensure your trees will remain free of infestation. The most popular question regarding HWA treatments is, “What does it cost?” Depending on the number and size of trees to be treated. The cost of removing and/or replacing the dead Hemlocks is significantly greater than the investment in HWA preventative treatments, so keeping your Hemlocks safe and healthy with preventative treatments is always a wise idea.

If you have Hemlocks on your property it is a good idea to schedule a free inspection with a Certified Arborist to ensure the health and safety of your Hemlock trees. Request a free evaluation below.

plant-health-care-consultation

Editors Note: This post was originally published in April 2012 and has been completely revamped and updated for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

Apple Scab: A Fungal Disease

Apple Scab: A Common Fungus

Apple Scab-1

Apple and Crabapple trees are very popular across our region; however, without proper care they can become infested with unwanted apple scab, effectively devastating the leaves and fruit.

Apple scab is a fungus that can infect the leaves and fruit of both apple and crabapple trees, and also mountain ash and pear trees. Scab appears as a brown velvet-like lesion, and it thrives during the wet periods of the spring and summer. It needs to be treated during the growing season.

 

How does Apple Scab affect my Tree?

apple-scab-leaf

Apple scab will be more of a problem to susceptible crabapple cultivars. Once the tree is infected the leaves will eventually turn yellow and fall prematurely. Highly susceptible crabapple trees can lose a majority of their leaves by mid-summer. This will cause the tree to become much weaker. Apple scab does not kill your trees but it can greatly affect its aesthetics as well as the growth of the fruit and yes, crabapples are edible! In severe cases it can reduce or completely eliminate the fruit yield for an entire growing season.

The Disease Cycle

Apple scab overwinters on leaves that are infected that had been shed already. Once the rainy days start to come in spring, the spores then are expelled from the infected leaves and are moved around by air currents and splashes of rain where they can then start new infections. If the weather is favorable (rainy/moist) it can enable the leaf spots that are infected to mature and produce new fungal spore which will reach the nearby leaves and in turn spreading the disease. Excessive rainfall in the prime seasons (spring and summer) often results in the disease coming back again with more severity.

How to Manage Apple Scab

  • Proper care measures include pruning in the late winter or early spring to increase airflow and remove any infected areas; however, it is best to prune when conditions are dry. Pruning during wet periods can actually aid in the spreading of scab.
  • Raking and destroying the leaves as they fall should reduce the severity of the disease next season as the fungus overwinters on partially decayed leaves.
  • Topical fungicide applications are also recommended every year to help prevent infestation on susceptible trees. 
    • Chemical fungicides are used for two purposes:
      1. Preventative: Sprayed on the leaves and fruit prior to infection. This will help effectively prevent the fungal spores from germinating or penetrating the host.2. Curative: Applied shortly after infection can hinder the development of the fungus which will limit the progression of the disease.

Being aware of scab now will help you prevent it next season. If your apples and crabapples were not treated for scab this spring, we recommend inspecting them to see if scab has developed. If so, we recommend you take the proper care measures beginning next March or April in order to prevent apple scab.

Pest Management Consultation

If you have any questions or concerns please don't hesitate to reach out to us at 877-308-8733! All estimates are free of charge. We look forward to hearing from you.

Editors Note: This post was originally published in July 2011 and has been revamped and updated for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

Controlling and Preventing Winter Moths

What Are Winter Moths?

Winter moths are invasive pests, originating from Europe and Western Asia. These insects were first found in North America in the 1930s; however, their population in Massachusetts exploded, causing home owners, property managers, and arborists’ tremendous stress, as winter moth larvae shredded and stripped the leaves off of their variety of deciduous trees.

Winter Moth Appearance

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The winter moth larvae are pale green caterpillars with white stripes that run down either side of their body. The male winter moth have a light tan color, with four elongated wings that encompass their bodies. The wings of males gives them a “furry” look. Female winter moths have a grey color, as well as tiny scales that give off that furry look just like the males. Unlike the males, the females are incapable of flight.

Dangers of the Winter Moth

Winter moths are only dangerous to your trees in the larval, or caterpillar stage; however, you can treat for them in both the egg and caterpillar stage with either spray or injection treatments. The larvae or caterpillars once hatched will scale the trees searching for fresh buds and leaves they can start devouring. Once they find their fresh bud they wriggle between the scales of the newly blooming buds and begin feeding on the flower and foliar buds from within. The caterpillars don’t stop and will continue to migrate from bud to bud devouring as much as they can. Large populations can quickly defoliate trees which can result in limb or tree failure. Once the caterpillars become mature they drop to the ground and envelope themselves in a soft, wooly cocoon for pupation. When they finish pupation, they emerge from the soil throughout November and December but if the temperature remains mild they can be active into January.

Common Tree Hosts for the Winter Moth

  • Oak Tree

  • Maple Tree

  • Cherry Trees

  • Ash Tree

  • White Elm Tree

  • Spruce Trees

  • Crabapple and Apple Trees

Prevention and Management Winter Moth

Winter Moths Can Be Controlled and Prevented

Let’s consider the calendar year here in Massachusetts. If we’re experiencing an average year temperature wise, you can expect winter moth eggs to begin hatching between late March and the third week in April. If we’re having an unusually warm late winter and early spring they will hatch sooner. Conversely, a colder winter and early spring will delay their hatching.

Winter Moth Prevention

It is best to prevent the pests from hatching with a horticultural oil treatment early in the spring. When the winter moths hatch they begin feasting on the budding leaves very early on, which can be extremely devastating to a tree. The winter moths will continue to feed and grow throughout the year. Treatments become more difficult as the winter moths grow, but it is still possible to control these pests. Spray or soil/trunk injection treatments with Spinosads and B.t.k can be used to defeat the caterpillars, which would otherwise feast on your leaves until dropping to the ground in May or June for the summer.

Treating and Controlling Winter Moth

In order to effectively treat winter moth, you first need to establish what stage the pests are in. Once you’ve identified the stage, then you can plan your treatment attack, but not without considering some other variables such as the size of tree to be treated, or proximity of homes or structures. These variables will help decide what type of treatment to use: topical spray application or injection treatment. For example, if you have an infested tree hanging over your swimming pool, you may want to consider an injection treatment.

It is important to treat for winter moths early in the year. Waiting until you physically see damage often means it is too late. Consider meeting with a Certified Arborist or Plant Health Expert in the late winter to discuss winter moth treatments.

If you have any questions or concerns about Winter Moth please contact us at 877-308-8733 or click the button below. 

request-a-winter-moth-consultation  

winter moth control

Pictured here are two examples of severe winter moth damage, with the culprit in the middle.

Editors Note: This post was originally published in March 2012 and has been revamped and updated for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

Rhododendrons VS Black Vine Weevil

What is a Black Vine Weevil?

The Black Vine Weevil (BVW) is an insect pest that injures plants, Rhododendrons being top choice throughout the US. In Massachusetts there are few natural predators of this species. 

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Adult Black Vine Weevils

The adult weevil is dark gray to black and has subtle white flecking. It has a short broad snout. It can lay as many as 300 eggs near plants over a period of 2-3 weeks. Eggs are laid near the base of the plants and will hatch in two weeks. Black Vine Weevils do not fly so they crawl from shrub to shrub. During daytime the adults hide in dark places; soil, garden debris, lead litter, mulch and even the crevices of the plant. The adult feeding rarely causes serious plant injury, however the feeding habit of the notching of leaves is evidence the pest is present. Action should be taken to mitigate damage by the next generation of BVW. 

Black Vine Weevil -

Black Vine Weevil Larvae

BVW Larvae are a creamy-white color with a brown head. They are the most destructive stage of the Black Vine Weevil. In August, the C-shaped larvae begin tunneling through roots and can girdle the stem feeding just below the soil line on cambium and cause plant death. When the BVW feeds it can cause nutrient deficiencies and poor functioning roots. If the plant has nutrient deficiencies or poor functioning roots the leaves yellow, wilt and plants can die. Thinner foliage is more susceptible than a thicker plant. 

Controlling Black Vine Weevil

BVW is an active feeder that will quickly drop to the ground if disturbed. This is when foliar applications work best. We recommend doing the following:

  • Pruning rhododendrons so foliage does not touch the ground reducing the Black Vine Weevil's access to the shrubs
  • Clear leaf litter to keep BVW from being able to hide underneath it
  • Apply two Summer Foliar Treatments
  • Fertilize your plants
  • Remove dead or infested foliage to limit overwintering sites

Are you seeing notches on your Rhododendron leaves? Is the damage so extensive that the entire leaf edges are jagged and unsightly? Give us a call now, young new growth is the particular foliage of choice for the BVW. We have more than one control option available.

Keeping plants healthy and happy is the first defense, fertilization is recommended!

If you have any questions about Black Vine Weevil or are interested in any of our services please do not hesitate to contact us at 877-308-8733 or click the link below!

Request A Free Consultation

Decline of Eastern White Pine in Eastern Massachusetts

Background on Eastern White Pine Trees

Eastern White Pine 2

The Eastern white pine tree was designated as the official state tree of Maine in 1945, which has been coined as the “The Pine Tree State” and appears on Maine’s state flag and seal. In 1955, the state of Michigan also chose the Eastern white pine to be their official state tree as a symbol of their logging history. The Eastern white pine is considered to be one of the largest conifer trees in the north eastern United States. Since 2009, the Eastern white pine has been experiencing dieback and general decline, which is a great concern regarding one of the most economically valuable and ecologically important forest trees in the northeast. Recently, the University of Massachusetts Amherst (UMass Amherst) posted information that begins to explain the reason for these symptoms of decline. According Dr. Nick Brazee, a plant pathologist at the UMass Amherst, it is a combination of climate change, several fungal pathogens, and a particular species of insects that are responsible for the decline in the Eastern white pines.

White Pine Needle Drop (WPND)

Disease is primarily responsible for the symptoms of declining pines, namely premature needle drop, yellowing of needles, resinosis, dieback of canopy, and branch and tree death. WPND is caused by several fungal pathogens. Once you see the needles begin to become discolored (yellow/brown), it is usually the cause of the root pathogens due to it affecting the entirety of the tree. At the same time, the environment for spore activity and germination has been fueled by the increase in temperatures and precipitation in the northeast region of the United States.

Caliciopsis Canker & Bast Scale

Caliciopsis Pine Canker Jen WeimerAnother fungus and insect complex that is also partially responsible for the dieback of Eastern white pines are the caliciopsis canker and white pine bast scale. Bast scale is tiny, black, oval-shaped scales that lack both eyes and legs. Bast scale use a long stylet to drain sap from outer layers of phloem (tissue) of twigs and branches. White pine bast scales live under lichens, which are slow growing plants that form crusty leaf-like growth on rocks and trees. These have been found on white pine branches. 

Recently, the white pine bast scale has been identified as a catalyst for the development of caliciopsis canker in white pine trees. Although the bast scale causes almost no damage to the tree, the feeding areas that they produce are extremely conducive to the development of caliciopsis cankers in trees. The primary problem with an outbreak of caliciopsis cankers is that they cause dead areas in the tree’s tissue and as more cankers develop, the affected branches will eventually be unable to disperse the water into the foliage and in which case, the tree will die. Root rot diseases can also affect the dieback of white pines, and will be addressed in a future post.

Ways to Manage White Pine Needle Drop

Young White Pine

In conclusion, tree thinning, or selective removal of branches, of existing white pines aids in the reduction of WPND by increasing radial growth, promoting crown vigor, and an overall general reduction in WPND. Many arborists have also found that fertilizing the tree with nitrogen can help to restore vigor, especially to trees highly stressed from WPND. Fungicide applications are often impractical for large trees or multiple trees, but focused applications on specimen or very young white pines can be helpful to control WPND. It has become clear that the issues affecting white pines are not going away any time soon, but can be controlled using an experienced, dedicated team of arborists.

If you have any questions, or you are interested in any of our tree services, please contact us at 877-308-8733, or request a free consultation. We look forward to hearing from you!

Request A Free Consultation

Bob Lees, MCLP

Photo of Caliciopsis Canker Courtesy of Jen Weimer

Invasive Vines: Black Swallow-Wort

What is Black Swallow-Wort?

Black swallow-wort and it’s “twin” Pale swallow-wort are two invasive vines currently growing in New England, and are deemed invasive in Massachusetts and Connecticut. These herbaceous, twining vines grow three to six feet, with opposite, shiny leaves 2” to 4” long. 

imageThe flowers on swallow-wort are dark, usually purple black on Black, and Maroon on Pale swallow-wort, and produces seedpods 1.5” to 3” long, bearing numerous seeds. Due to a strong fibrous root system, eradication by digging is difficult, as plants can regenerate from root fragments.  A healthy stand of swallow-wort may produce between 1000 and 2000 seeds per square meter, per year, depending on sunlight. Swallow-worts grow in full sun to partial shade, and are more invasive in full sunlight.

Problems Black Swallow-wort Cause

Black Swallow-wort and Pale Swallow-wort invade planting beds, climbing up your trees and shrubs and even under your storm windows. According to, http://nyis.info/invasive_species/swallow-wort/ they are two distinct species but share similar characteristics. A similar characteristic that they both share is that they are both perennial climbing vines. Which means that they don't just die over time, they just keep reoccurring through the thousands of seeds they produce. Once the Black Swallow-wort settles in, they form extensive patches that overgrow and smother the native vegetation.

How Invasive Vines affect Monarch Butterflies

Besides its ability to displace native plants, swallow-worts are also interfering with the reproductive success of the Monarch Butterfly, and possibly other species as well. 

Monarchs normally lay their eggs on native milkweeds, which are disappearing due to competitive pressure from swallow-worts. In addition, Monarch eggs which are laid on Black swallow-wort have nearly 0% hatching success. This is because when the larvae are born they can't ingest or use the toxin that is in either the Black Swallow-wort or the Pale Swallow-wort in which they won't be able to survive. 

How to control Black Swallow-wort

Control is particularly difficult, because of the rhizome root system and fibrous root. Early detection and physical removal is recommended as the best control method. It is crucial to dig out the roots completely. Chemical methods are rarely 100% effective, and there is no biological control at present. Being able to identify and remove the individuals before they seed and spread is an important tool in the effort to stop the species.

If you have any questions, or you are interested in any of our tree services, please contact us at 877-308-8733, or request a free consultation. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Photo courtesy of Becky Gallery, Harpswell Heritage Land Trust

Sycamore Anthracnose Defoliates Trees

We have seen widespread defoliation of Sycamore trees this year due to Sycamore Anthracnose.

Sycamore Tree with Anthracnose

A picture of a Sycamore that has been affected by Sycamore Anthracnose

For those of you who do not know what Sycamore Anthracnose is, it is a fungal pathogen that is generally related to wet spring weather. Unfortunately wet spring weather is what we have been seeing a lot of. It infects newly developing shoots and leaves causing the buds to have very slow development to leaf out in the spring, or in some cases never leaf out. 

Signs and Symptoms of Sycamore Anthracnose

Infecting the vascular system of a tree this fungal disease attacks buds, leaves and twigs, defoliating the trees and damaging the small branches. Sycamore Anthracnose spreads from an infected tree to healthy ones when its fungal spores are transported by the wind. 

Sycamore Tree Branches with Anthracnose

Signs that a Sycamore tree is suffering from this disease:

  • Leaf blight or defoliation early in the summer
  • Twisted or gnarled branches or twigs
  • Formations of dead or dying twigs and small branches also called "witches brooms"
  • Lesions on leaves that are black or brown in color
  • Sunken cankers on younger twigs or small branches

 Managing Sycamore Anthracnose

From what we see these trees should re-foliate this year. In order to really get a handle on this disease to make sure it does not spread to a healthy tree. We recommend looking into some treatment plans.

Deep root fertilization is recommended to help invigorate trees as they have been stressed by the Anthracnose. This will give the tree the push it needs to flush new growth along with the help of warmer and drier weather. 

Early season treatment with fungicide applications or injection can help manage this disease. Contact an arborist today to come assess your trees and see what treatment would be best for you. 

If you have any questions, or you are interested in any of our tree services, please contact us at 877-308-8733, or request a free consultation. We look forward to hearing from you!

Request A Free Consultation

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid is Killing Our Trees

What is Hemlock Woolly Adelgid?

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA) is a tiny insect that is barely visible. It is atypical of most other insect species as it is dormant for much of the growing season and active throughout the winter.Hemlock-woolly-adelgid.jpeg

When is Hemlock Woolly Adelgid active?

By mid-July, the immature insects settle on the stems, at the base of the needles, and become dormant, neither feeding nor developing. By mid-October, the insect resumes feeding and development. By mid-February they start producing new egg masses. Most people become aware of this pest when they notice the white, cottony egg masses lined up at the base of the needles on their Hemlocks.

How Does HWA Damage Trees?

The Hemlock Woolly Adelgid sucks the sap from Hemlock needles but also introduces a chemical from its saliva which acts as a toxin. This toxin accelerates the demise of the tree. The loss of sap will cause needles to brown and drop, leaving trees unable to produce food and energy via photosynthesis.

Healthy trees, in good growing sites, may withstand infestations for 5-10 years before being seriously affected. Trees stressed from drought, soil compaction or those in poor growing sites may succumb to HWA within 3 years.

This pest attacks both the Eastern (Canada) Hemlock and the Carolina Hemlock, two species common to New England. The Western Hemlock is resistant to this pest, but does not grow well in the Northeast.

Managing Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

Once this pest has been identified on Hemlocks, it must be managed quickly. Applications of horticultural oil have been shown to be extremely effective against Hemlock Woolly Adelgid. The oil kills the organism by suffocation and is effective against all life stages, including the eggs. Severely infested trees will need more intensive pesticide treatments.

Once the pest has been brought under control, the trees continue to require once or twice yearly treatments. Untreated trees in surrounding areas will act a reservoir for this pest and serve to re-infest treated trees. Wind and birds are primarily responsible for the movement of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid from tree to tree.

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid is a serious threat to our beautiful Hemlocks and should not be ignored. If you have Hemlocks on your property it is a good idea to schedule a free inspection with a Certified Arborist to ensure the health and safety of your Hemlock trees. Request a free evaluation below.

REQUEST A FREE CONSULTATION

 

Gypsy Moth Infestation Expected to Be Bad in Spring 2016

If you don’t remember the Gypsy moth infestation of the 80’s, you will be introduced to this insect in the Spring.  Last year we saw pockets of Gypsy Moth infestation in the Topsfield area and surrounding towns. As their population increases, more and more local areas can expect tree damage from these nasty pests.

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The following description is from U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Insect Leaflet 162:

The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar Linnaeus, is one of the most notorious pests of hardwood trees in the Eastern United States. Since 1980, the gypsy moth has defoliated close to a million or more forested acres each year.

In 1981, a record 12.9 million acres were defoliated. This is an area larger than Rhode Island, Massachusetts,and Connecticut combined.

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A single gypsy moth caterpillar can eat a square foot of leaves a day.  Although trees have a second set of leaves ready to replace those they lose, this takes significant energy. Three or four years of complete defoliation can result in the death of even a large tree.  In wooded suburban areas, during periods of infestation, when trees are visibly defoliated, gypsy moth larvae crawl up and down walls, across roads, over outdoor furniture, and even inside homes.

Gypsy Moths emerge about one month after Winter Moth/Cankerworms, another ferocious feeder, extending the caterpillar feeding season by at least a month.

How to Treat for Gypsy Moths:

Gypsy Moths are treated in the same way as Winter Moth/Cankerworms, by spray or injection. If you are treating your trees for Winter Moth/Cankerworms, an additional 1 or 2 treatments may be needed to protect your trees from Gypsy Moths.

If you'd like to schedule a free consultation with a Plant Health expert, click below:

Request a Free Consultation

Beech Trees Suffer Epidemic Decline

An epidemic decline is affecting European Beech trees up and down the east coast. Beech trees are being infected by a fungus that causes bleeding cankers on the lower trunk and eventual die-off in the upper branches. If this fungus is left untreated the tree will die within five years.

Phytophthora on Beech Tree

Beech Phytophthora pathogen is the culprit. This fungus enters wounds and succulent roots causing cankers that ooze reddish-brown sap. Eventually, new leaves remain small and yellow, and branches begin to die.

These ‘bleeding’ cankers cause the cambium, the living layer of the tree where most vital cellular activity takes place, to lose moisture and dry out. This leads to root loss and canopy decline resulting in the death of the tree.

How to Treat Beech Phytophthora

Treatment with a broad spectrum fungicide, applied to the trunk, can stop the damage, allowing the tree to recover, essentially ‘healing the wounds’.

Helping a tree to grow is the most important thing to improve the health of a sick tree. Radial trenching with an air spade, back filling with compost and deep root, liquid fertilization have proven to be the best methods to increase and invigorate tree growth. [Learn more about plant health care here]

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Please note that Beech Phytophthora only affects European Beech trees, not American Beech. European Beech are the most common variety used in landscape plantings.

If you would like a Certified Arborist to inspect your Beech trees, as well as the other trees and plants on your property, please call us at 877-308-8733 or click below for a free consultation.

Request a Free Consultation

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